Comments on: 10 Most Common Electric Fence Problems Part 1 http://blog.kencove.com/10-most-common-electric-fence-problems-part-1/ Electric Fence, High Tensile Fencing Supplies Wed, 09 Aug 2017 17:00:39 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 By: Kencove http://blog.kencove.com/10-most-common-electric-fence-problems-part-1/comment-page-19/#comment-200228 Wed, 09 Aug 2017 17:00:39 +0000 http://blog.kencove.com/?p=93#comment-200228 Hello, Liz. We do not install fence or troubleshoot installed fence. If you would like to give our sales team a call, we may be able to connect you with local contractors. If you would like to troubleshoot your fence on your own, we would recommend the Kencove Fault Finder (VPA). The VPA provides a digital reading of the voltage on your fence line, and it also shows the direction of an electrical short if one is present.

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By: Kencove http://blog.kencove.com/10-most-common-electric-fence-problems-part-1/comment-page-19/#comment-200227 Wed, 09 Aug 2017 16:59:07 +0000 http://blog.kencove.com/?p=93#comment-200227 Good morning, Jim. What is the output joule rating on your energizer? How many miles (or feet) of fence do you currently have under power? If your energizer is too large for your fence, you may be experiencing induction. We recommend one output joule per mile of fence. If your energizer is appropriately sized, you may want to check your bracing wire to ensure it is not too close to a hot wire and transferring energy through posts and then the gate.

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By: Kencove http://blog.kencove.com/10-most-common-electric-fence-problems-part-1/comment-page-19/#comment-200226 Wed, 09 Aug 2017 16:58:45 +0000 http://blog.kencove.com/?p=93#comment-200226 Hello, Rick. Have you tested your ground rods? If you test your ground rods and find a reading over 2.0kV, it’s a good indicator of a dead short on your line. Also, can you test the energizer itself? Simply unhook the fence from the energizer, test the hot and ground using your voltmeter, and you should get an accurate reading of the output of the energizer. If the output on the energizer itself is reading low (below 5.0 kV), you may need to send the energizer in for repair or replace the unit. If the energizer is working properly, you may have a poor connection somewhere on your fence. Let us know what you find out about the ground reading and the energizer itself.

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By: rick http://blog.kencove.com/10-most-common-electric-fence-problems-part-1/comment-page-19/#comment-200204 Tue, 08 Aug 2017 13:49:31 +0000 http://blog.kencove.com/?p=93#comment-200204 I have a mark 8 30 mile fencer and it worked just fine. reading 10 to 13 volts.
now I can only get 1.2 to 2.o volt reading. I have checked the complete fence and everything is on insulators, nothing grounded out, but can not get any higher reading than the 2.o volts?

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By: Jim http://blog.kencove.com/10-most-common-electric-fence-problems-part-1/comment-page-19/#comment-200163 Sun, 06 Aug 2017 07:41:09 +0000 http://blog.kencove.com/?p=93#comment-200163 Query: Electric fence working well, but wife getting zapped when opening gates. (Gates do not touch any powered lines) End posts are round galvanised and gates are attached via downey fittings. Each run has 3 wires, top and bottom powered and middle is earth. Porcelain insulators for power wires at each end of each run. All pickets have plastic insulators to hold wires. There is no logical reason I can see why current is conducting through the gate. The only wire not insulated and physically touching the end posts is the earth wire. I’m at a loss to figure out why the zap is occurring. Ideas?

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By: Liz mckay http://blog.kencove.com/10-most-common-electric-fence-problems-part-1/comment-page-19/#comment-200153 Sun, 06 Aug 2017 00:44:00 +0000 http://blog.kencove.com/?p=93#comment-200153 Who trouble shoots your fences in Saskatchewan Canada send a phone number please having trouble with this electric fencer

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By: Kencove http://blog.kencove.com/10-most-common-electric-fence-problems-part-1/comment-page-19/#comment-200074 Tue, 01 Aug 2017 18:25:34 +0000 http://blog.kencove.com/?p=93#comment-200074 Sean, you do not need to connect your ground rods to your fence, however, this would be helpful in dry, sandy conditions, which sounds like the soil you have. We would recommend one negative wire about 3” away from the hot wires to use as your ground. You can have more than one negative wire, just keep them spaced apart from your hot wires. Although you have your wires spaced 3”-4” already, this leads us to believe you are experiencing induction. Induction happens when you have too much energy on too small of a fence line. What is the output joule rating on your energizer? How many lines or feet of wire do you have? We recommend one joule per mile of fence. Let us know if there is anything else we can help you with. Our product specialists are available Monday-Friday 8am-5pm EST and Saturdays 8am-noon EST. Give us a call at 1-800-KENCOVE. We’d be happy to help you out!

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By: Kencove http://blog.kencove.com/10-most-common-electric-fence-problems-part-1/comment-page-19/#comment-200073 Tue, 01 Aug 2017 18:23:52 +0000 http://blog.kencove.com/?p=93#comment-200073 Marty, could your old energizer by chance be a high-impedance model? If your new energizer is low impedance, this could be the reason behind the lack of pop. High-impedance models send a continuous or very long pulse of voltage down the line. Low-impedance energizers send quick pulses more frequently down the line. These quick pulses do not “burn” weeds along the fence line. This could be the reason you are now lacking the pop. Reading 8,000 volts on your fence is GREAT! You have built a sturdy fence with adequate grounding. I wouldn’t be too worried about the pop sound, just keep an eye on your voltage and you shouldn’t have anything to worry about.

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By: Kencove http://blog.kencove.com/10-most-common-electric-fence-problems-part-1/comment-page-8/#comment-200070 Tue, 01 Aug 2017 18:19:30 +0000 http://blog.kencove.com/?p=93#comment-200070 Hello, John. We would not recommend grounding your energizer to anything other than ground rods or setting up your fence as a positive/negative system. By grounding your fence to your building, you will be unable to complete the circuit, which means nothing will get shocked. You also have the potential to make your barn hot (electrified) which could be deadly. We recommend all ground beds be at least 50’ away from other buried lines including water, electricity, and other ground beds.

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By: John http://blog.kencove.com/10-most-common-electric-fence-problems-part-1/comment-page-8/#comment-200050 Mon, 31 Jul 2017 18:05:08 +0000 http://blog.kencove.com/?p=93#comment-200050 Can I ground my electric fence charge to my free standing metal barn workshop in lieu of using grounding rods?

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